Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person To some extent, but I respect a non-Muslim person more No, if someone is a Muslim, I dislike him see voting resultssaving...
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100
2 votes
May 20, 2015

I was open minded about Muslims and Islamic culture up until 4months ago when i moved into a shared house. 6 guys, 3 of them Muslim. Now I`m substantially less tolerant.. I try hard to be as open as possible when meeting Muslims but i have a tainted view now due to my experiences. While the guys i live with aren`t necessarily bad people they are inflexible and intolerant of other view points and cultures even though it`s liberal policies and countries like the one we live in that allow them the opportunity to migrate and study. I`m getting to the point where i think "fuck em". If they aren`t going to respect the things that allow them freedoms then maybe they don`t deserve them.

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
2 votes
Oct 7, 2015

I respect and love all human beings. I thereby respect and love all Muslims. I deal with Muslims on a case-by-case basis.

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100
User voted To some extent, but I respect a non-Muslim person more.
2 votes
Feb 22, 2016

It is hard to say or explain it.

I respect all good people.

If i take look on religious people, then i have problem only with Muslims. It is for me only one religion where i feel that there is lack of respect to others and mainly non Islamic religions. Islam is look as mostly fanatic intolerable government religion.

Today most people are not interest about human history, not much know or understand in Quran true words meanings and about religions.

I appeal to all readers to thing about all know major old religions and why is only Islam is that much problematic?

Religion it is not only about itself but mainly about people, that same as who lead us.

If i read in history and right understand, then i have only one Muslim person that i have in deep honor. And that person is Saladin.

In global about Muslim people, i rather stay in safe distance and try carefully inspect and test some of them if they are good people and with them i not have problem to respect their belief. And that is if they do not conquer land by build mosques, try converting my beliefs and respect me that as i am. Then i do not have problem to respect them and their belief. It is freedom choice.

But there is biggest problem which most western people not understand and not known.
Travel in Muslims country mostly not help and not discover correct informations for most western people.
They not know that if they are mans foreigners and local people speak with them in another way than true natural way. Travel in that counties as woman foreigner is really dangerous roulette with life if that woman is not have excellent knowledge and experience with local people.
It is also problems that many western people not fully understand Quram words meanings.

But at the end: all is depend on every person how she is, if good or bad human.
And it is also all on about luck whom we meet.
Not all people are bad or good.

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
1 vote
Jul 14, 2015

Muslims get the same amount of basic respect I afford to all human strangers, however, free thinkers get more respect and trust from me than anyone who is religious.

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
main reply
1 vote,
Nov 9, 2015

Why are the two mutually exclusive? Follow up question: Is it not possible for someone, through free thought and free will (if those two things exist at all is a discussion for another day), to to decide that they desire the structure and spirituality of a religion?

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
4 votes,
Nov 11, 2015

Religion is choosing to believe something for which there isn't any evidence. Using belief that way is closely related to mental illness. If you discard reason for wishful thinking you have started down a slippery slope.

Alternately, if someone chooses to engage in religion because of social reasons: community, friendship, emotional support, networking, acceptance etc. Then that's a choice that has less to do with believing and more to do with social convention. Do they fiercely believe all the crazy stuff religion serves up? Hard to say....Do they really want to submit to stone-age morality or trust a clergy of pedophiles? Probably not, but loneliness can be compelling, and in some communities the pressure to conform is just enormous.

The ability to think about reality, morality, and humanity in an open and honest way is somewhat rare. In general, people are happy to be the passive recipients of ideology, rather than active seekers of knowledge and truth. It is much, much harder to stand alone, in the face of pervasive insanity and say, "I am not buying the bullshit. No matter what."

As a person with a degree in philosophy, who is an active seeker of knowledge and truth - I am more impressed by that choice than the sheep-like folks who identify with the flock. That's just me.

Finally, spirituality and feelings of transcendence are normal human experiences, but there is no need to wrap them up in a bunch of superstitious nonsense. If you need structure, it can be found in many places outside of a church. Ultimately, I think religion is an aesthetic choice. People like it because they like the icons and rituals to which they are accustomed. Stepping out of the comfort zone is hard, but that's also how we as humans, change and grow.

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
2 votes,
Nov 12, 2015

Thanks for the response. Just egging on the conversation here...

"As a person with a degree in philosophy, who is an active seeker of knowledge and truth"

Let's play Devil's advocate for a second. You say you have a degree in philosophy. In attaining that degree, did you not have to read the works of various famous philosophers? Aristotle, Plato, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche? And I'm assuming (genuine assumptions here; I'm have no legitimate education in philosophy) you also read less famous ones as well? In general, I think it's safe to say that you've read a lot of philosophy.

I think it's also safe to say that you've absorbed much of that philosophy, consciously and unconsciously, and that it influences the way that you think.

The "unconsciously" is the important part. Your thoughts are influenced not by you yourself exclusively, but also by the minds of people long dead who never knew you, who put words down on a page that you absorbed and now believe in. Sounds much like religion, no?

"But," you may say, "I chose what to read, and what to believe." Same in religion. You yourself stated that most religious people don't want to submit to the "stone-age morality" explicitly stated in their holy book.

Are they following the flock? Sure, but you are simply following a different flock. A different set of words. "But," you may say, "many of these words are my own. They are thoughts different from all else I've read and seen." Keep in mind that non-conformity can also be a form of conformity.

I was talking with a friend's parent recently (btw, the reason I have no legitimate philosophical education? I'm in high school.). He said that he remembered when Elvis was the big thing. Everybody, everybody, in his generation loved Elvis. You can't have that anymore. Now, if something becomes big enough, "mainstream" enough, people will eventually start to criticize it simply for the sake of being different (consciously or unconsciously). This applies to One Direction, certainly, but it also applies, to an extent, to religion.

Now being a "hipster" is just as mainstream as before.

That was an odd tangent. The point is, opposition to a widely-held belief or trend can be just as conformist as ascribing to the belief or trend itself.

This calls into question free thought and free will. How can you know that your thoughts are really yours, that you are not being subconsciously influenced by factors that you cannot control, or even know? I believe that free will and free thought exists, but also that it is ridiculous to attribute anything at all to free will or free thought, because everything we do is so muddled with a bevy of influences that we cannot possibly untangle the web.

I would ask you to prove that you are, in fact, "an active seeker of knowledge and truth", and that you, too, are not identifying with with an "flock." Prove to me that you are not a "sheep-like folk."

I would say that's impossible, but you're the philosophy major. I look forward to what you have to say on this subject.

(Just a reminder, this is all Devil's advocacy. And yes, I realize I've completely shifted this away from religion, but frankly, I find this subject far more interesting.)

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
2 votes,
Nov 12, 2015

Thank you for the inviting conversation! I read quite a lot of dry ancient and not so ancient text in my program. I began as a spiritual non-denominational person who had already studied various kinds of esoteric thought: Wicca, Shamanism, Gnosticism, Eastern thought, Buddhism, Taoism, and some Santeria, Chaos Magick etc.
But, of all those topics I grew disenchanted, rifling through the superficial differences among them to try and find the essential thread that runs through them all. I realized that I wanted to considers the ideas in their most abstract (Platonic) form, without all the trappings of religion. Rather than focus on the aesthetics of one culture's version or another, I wanted to focus on metaphysics itself, epistemology, ethics, logic etc. What I really care about is the meat of the matter, the meaning and ideas about reality - rather than the appearance of someone's preferred symbol, or set of rules.
All religions offer the same thing, a sort of map to carry you through life, guidelines, comforting after-death theories, and a god-form that hopefully you can see yourself reflected in. For many, the religion they are born into is satisfying enough, they accept the familiar symbols, the guidebook, the received values etc. But for others, this initial offering is not a good fit, and so they begin to seek.

"All roads lead home," no doubt....we will all find ourselves at death's door sooner or later, so the way we travel is what matters. For some it is easy to ride one of the big trains "Christianity" "Islam" "Buddhism" - but then there are those who decide to go it alone, and they begin to climb with their own backpack, taking a road which sometimes seems to be for them alone. This is how I am. Picking my way up the mountain on a solitary path, confronting each obstacle with why I alone carry.
Do I find comfort in the words and insights of those who have gone before me?
Certainly! I have my favorite books, music, icons, symbols, words of wisdom, beloved teachers and guides who have been there along the way. I have written my own prayers to my own gods, and I have listened to the sublime secrets that lay hidden in my own heart. Studying philosophy was just one part of that journey. And my journey is not really any different than anyone else's, it is only that I have made my own way of it - but I have found the place where I connect to all life. And now, after so much study, in my mid-life I am probably best described as a spiritual agnostic.

The crux of my position regarding religion is that it is an aesthetic choice. The ramifications of that statement are extensive when considered fully. Religion:
*It is an aesthetic choice.*
There is no one true religion, there are only preferred lenses for processing reality. When seen this way, it is perfectly reasonable to evaluate the quality of each lens. Some are cruder than others, some are very fine, and all will show you a bit of the truth, but all contain flaws. I spent quite a lot of time trying them on, looking through each one, considering its perspective. For my purposes in this life, however, I found it more useful to craft my own lens slowly, carefully, throughout the course of a lifetime, and always as a work in progress, rather than use one of the others which has been around for centuries. Again, a personal, aesthetic choice.

My respect for all humans sits at the core of my ethical principles, but my admiration is reserved for those who ponder: the life long learners, those who never 'know' but always are seeking, for those who do not receive beliefs, but generate them, for those few others who have braved the world in search of their own meaning. When I see them, I know them....
It's they who win my heart.

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User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
0 votes,
Nov 12, 2015

Further, I should note that I am not at all convinced of free will. And, I do not find that it can resolve the Question of Evil.

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User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
0 votes,
Feb 3, 2016

There's no compelling evidence either way. Most religious people have had personal experiences that are vivid, the kind of experiences they would use to justify a host of other beliefs we generally accept as probably valid like "I love my child" and "Those storms look like they're about to start raining". It seems to me that the problem is when people ACT like the question has been firmly decided either way.

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
1 vote
Nov 23, 2015

im pretty sure the only reason the only reason some muslims might be rude or even just straight up radical, is because of poverty. with poverty running rampant in their home countries, they dont have access to proper education and dont really see the world in a globalized view. this helps grow resentments even after they've moved to a western country. now its really up to anyone as to why those countries are so poor/

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75
User voted To some extent, but I respect a non-Muslim person more.
4 votes
Apr 22, 2015

I do not respect (Insert race, religion, minority status, or political belief here) because they are a (Insert race, religion, minority status,or political belief here). I respect people that earn my respect. Respect isn't something that should be given out of a sense of entitlement. Take president barry, for example: The office and the title deserve respect however, if the person holding that title allows things to happen (like exerting executive privilege over Fast and Furious documents, or changing a mandate in a law without going through congress.) then that person should not be respected.

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67
User voted To some extent, but I respect a non-Muslim person more.
3 votes
Apr 22, 2015

No, I look back to 9-11 and I watched millions of Muslims cheering the attacks. I watched as Muslims cheered, while contractors hung from a bridge. They were cheering bombings in Boston. Then I read how Muslims treat Christians, the death sentence for “apostasy” for Meriam Yahia Ibrahim who has also been sentenced to 100 lashes for having sex with her husband. Then I think about systematic torture and brutal executions of Christians and their children in Indonesia. And I think about Salman Rushdie and Lars Vilks, who dared to say or draw about Muslims and Muhammad, death threats and attempts.

Yet, I'm told how peaceful, Islam is, how others have hijacked the religion. But, when I read and see how the Muslim people treat others of differing faiths, how can anyone say the religion was hijacked? Have millions upon millions of Muslims been hijacked? Maybe the people who say Islam is peaceful are just picking and choosing what parts they follow or are blind to their own religion.

Yes, I have read the Qur'an (I have also read the bible both testaments) and Islam is not peaceful. So if you say you're a Muslim, you don't automatically get respect from me. For the record I am an Atheist, which would mean I would face execution under the law in many Muslim countries. But, unlike many others I wouldn't die without a fight and I am willing to kill and be killed then convert.

And yes I KNOW this will get many down votes.

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User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
main reply
0 votes,
Feb 3, 2016

How many Christians cheered because of the extrajudicial assassination of Osama?

Or the bombing of Iraqis?

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User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
0 votes,
Feb 3, 2016

Osama Bin Laden orchestrated the murder of almost 3000 people, all innocent civilians.

I believe there is a very big difference between applauding the death of Osama Bin Laden and doing the same for the death of 2996 innocent people.

Could you show us strong evidence of Christians expressing their joy after witnessing the death of civilian muslims during the Iraq war?

This topic more about respecting (or not respecting) Muslims and a little less about Christians. I believe there's a possibility of going slightly off-topic here, so I have made this topic: "Do you respect Christians?". Of course, everyone is still free to share their opinions on Christianity in both topics as it is obvious both religions are often found in the same sentences whenever there are debates surrounding them.

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User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
0 votes,
Feb 3, 2016

And George W. Bush orchestrated the murder of hundreds of thousands of people, almost all innocent civilians. Is it legal or acceptable to assassinate him?

How about I do you one better: How about Ann Coulter saying, "I'm getting a little fed up with hearing about, oh, civilian casualties. I think we ought to nuke North Korea right now just to give the rest of the world a warning". How many conservatives condemned her for that? How many cheered?

The point is the hypocrisy. No one condemns any group but Muslims this way.

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100
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
3 votes,
Feb 3, 2016

The difference between Osama Bin Laden and George W. Bush is that Bin Laden, initially, specifically planned to harm civilians whilst Bush, once again initially, planned to send his army against another.

When Bin Laden chose to execute his plan, did he know civilians would be the prime victims of this attack? The answer is yes.

What was Bush's ultimate goal, on the other hand? Do you truly believe he was planning to murder "hundreds of thousands of people, all innocent civilians"? Was it part of his plan? I do believe he was one of the worst, if not the worst President of the United States, and yet, I don't think so.

Intent shouldn't be forgotten when there are comparisons to be made between both men, now that's for sure.

"The point is the hypocrisy. No one condemns any group but Muslims this way."

Proportionally and statistically speaking, I'd guess that Jews probably are still on top of the list after numerous decades. And maybe you could throw in Americans in there are well. After all, those who refuse to see a Muslim connection in the Islamic extremist-led unrest of the vast majority of countries with high Muslim populations will usually, and sometimes even solely blame the actions of America and Israel.

There is also another form of hypocrisy, I think. It comes from those who try to believe - and make us believe at the same time - that being the most powerful man in the world, being President of the United States of America, is an easy job, or at least a job where mistakes and failures are not possible. In their hypocrisy, they will try to convince us and themselves that some other person or country could've done it better, but the reality is that they have no idea.

But once again, maybe we're going a little off-topic here, as the question is about Muslims and respecting them.

Personally, I do respect Muslims in general. I don't believe in any religion, but I respect their right to follow whatever they believe in. One thing, however, is that integration is very dear to me. If one person says the laws and teachings in his holy book are more important than my state's laws, traditions, etc. - things me and my ancestors have preserved for centuries - it is, to me, proof that this person doesn't want to adapt. And if that person chooses to openly challenge our way of living by using my country's openness against itself in order to have his book's laws and teachings prevail over everything else, this person will definitely lose my respect, because my country's past values have made it the country it is now and these values are very dear to me.

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User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
0 votes,
Feb 3, 2016

The difference between Osama Bin Laden and George W. Bush is that Bin Laden, initially, specifically planned to harm civilians whilst Bush, once again initially, planned to send his army against another.
When Bin Laden chose to execute his plan, did he know civilians would be the prime victims of this attack? The answer is yes.

And he planned to send his army against another in order to illegally overthrow that government, take its resources and prove his country to be supremely powerful. Why is that superior again?

What was Bush's ultimate goal, on the other hand? Do you truly believe he was planning to murder "hundreds of thousands of people, all innocent civilians"? Was it part of his plan? I do believe he was one of the worst, if not the worst President of the United States, and yet, I don't think so.
Intent shouldn't be forgotten when there are comparisons to be made between both men, now that's for sure.

So let's be actually fair about the intent, then. Osama didn't do so out of a feeling of sadism: He did so because he wanted to attack the West and fight so it stopped doing illegal and colonialist things in the Middle East.

Bush was APATHETIC about the consequences of enriching corporations and proving American strength. That's actually worse. At least Osama RECOGNIZED that civilian casualties would be an outcome and cared, one way or the other. Bush simply couldn't view Iraqis as even human or worthy of consideration.

Proportionally and statistically speaking, I'd guess that Jews probably are still on top of the list after numerous decades. And maybe you could throw in Americans in there are well. After all, those who refuse to see a Muslim connection in the Islamic extremist-led unrest of the vast majority of countries with high Muslim populations will usually, and sometimes even solely blame the actions of America and Israel.
There is also another form of hypocrisy, I think. It comes from those who try to believe - and make us believe at the same time - that being the most powerful man in the world, being President of the United States of America, is an easy job, or at least a job where mistakes and failures are not possible. In their hypocrisy, they will try to convince us and themselves that some other person or country could've done it better, but the reality is that they have no idea.

How hard is it to NOT bomb a country illegally?

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Load more (4) in reply to Fred BC's post (And George W. Bush orchestrated the murder of hundreds of thousands of people, almost all innocent civilians. Is it legal or acceptable to assassinate him? How about I do you one better: How about Ann...)
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User voted To some extent, but I respect a non-Muslim person more.
0 votes,
Feb 3, 2016

Well, if Osama hadn't declared war, then you might have a point, but as he did declare war, he declared war twice once in 1996 and again in 1998, and in a war you are allowed to attack your enemy.

And if you had followed the press, you would have know that 64% of Americans had approved of military action against Iraq; however, 63% wanted a diplomatic solution rather than go to war There was also a growing anti-war movement.

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-1
User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
1 vote
Jan 14

This is a four or six time, when i see here the quiz about "respect and muslims", seriously Why r u so special, why r u need to be pointed separate? Why r u requesting additional support?

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0
opinion
0 votes
Apr 25, 2015

I do not respect them, how can you respect people that are coming to your country and sit their arses off, doing nothing just using social care and yet, complaining about how low it is or how they arent tread equal towards others?

How does one can respect a guest that you invite to your house (as in country) and instead of abide the rules that your house have, they try to sit in the master's chair and spit out their own rules? It's not your house, if you do not like our rules then go away, we don't need pest in our fields.

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User voted Yes, I treat a Muslim person just like any other person.
main reply
0 votes,
Jun 9, 2015

What you write about isn't an attribute of Muslims but any random group of people, be them christians, polish or rich kids.

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0
0 votes
Aug 9, 2015

I respect Muslims as humans. Tolerance is respecting someone as a human even if you disagree, dislike, or abhor their beliefs (not to neccessarily say I feel that way about Islam, I don't have any major issues with their beliefs).

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0
0 votes
Sep 10, 2015

I judge the individual but do not trust them due to their religion.

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0
0 votes
Nov 23, 2015

i just wants to know why you all hate with muslims......Muslims is not terrorist and terrorist is not muslims....

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