71
7 votes
Mar 22, 2016

A subsidized health insurance plan isn't going to reduce costs of healthcare enough if it is still privatized. we either need to get rid of it or give universal healthcare to all, preferably the later

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100
main reply
1 vote,
Mar 22, 2016

There is something wrong with a government program that calls the VA Healthcare System the :minimum standard of essential care" under the law. I pay a dental premium every month and so far it has not covered all the pre-existing dental conditions I have. I paid $2400 this month for a bridge which means I have to wait 8 months before I see the dentist again for more treatments I need. Meanwhile, I AM PAYING FOR EVERYONE ELSE and I live in a camper... even as I pay off a student loan I got under the GI Bill which is NOT FREE, not even interest free! I do not have an ideological opinion about it at all... just LIFE AS I KNOW IT.

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100
1 vote,
Mar 22, 2016

I agree. VA can not even keep up with the GI who need it now we want a national health care system.

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-1
1 vote,
Mar 22, 2016

Minium standard of essential care refers to health care, not dental care.

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50
main reply
2 votes,
Mar 22, 2016

While I do not oppose the ACA on an idealogical basis, I think that trying to create a centralized healthcare system for a nation as large and as populous as the United State will be disastrous. What Congress should have done was passed a bill that required the states to ensure that all of their citizens should have access to quality healthcare. America is a federation, so trying to adapts the national healthcare systems of nations like France or the UK would by like trying to put a square block through a circular hole.

We should adapt the national systems of nations like France and the UK on a state level, but only to comparable populations. The UK's system may work for a state like Texas (22 million) or California (35 million), but probably would be unsuccessful in a state like Louisiana (4.7 million).

Obviously, mine is not a complete solution, so feel free to add or subtract from it.

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100
1 vote,
Mar 22, 2016

My understanding of universal social healthcare in Europe is that everyone pays some extra tax, then gets free healthcare service from the government. Why would that not work in a more populous country?

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100
1 vote,
May 3, 2016

This is a very mobile society. People move from one state to another for jobs, to be closer to family, etc. If I move from say, California to New Mexico for a job opportunity, will New Mexico welcome me and my pre-existing conditions with open arms? Also, what if a person lives in Texas, but has a heart attack while on a business trip to Washington, D.C.? Will a state-based health care system work in another jurisdiction? Will there be 50 (or 51) different sets of rules about how to reimburse medical expenses for a person from one state who is hospitalized in another?

The problem with both our health care system before ACA and now under the ACA, is that it is too complicated and therefore too inefficient and therefore too expensive. Whatever we do to reform or replace ACA should simplify the system, not make it more complicated. Health insurance should not be through one's employer and doctors and patients should both know what a procedure costs before it is performed. Apart from emergency care, a patient ought to be able to shop around for blood tests, MRI's and maybe even surgeries.

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100
1 vote,
Mar 22, 2016

i do like this idea and think it would be better than the feds running it. so basically require states to implement universal healthcare

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50
4 votes,
Mar 22, 2016

I disagree repeal the law, as it will never work fairly for the majority of the people. I just look at the site for and individual who makes 1100 a month his premiums 307.00 per month no assistance was available for him because he made to much money. We need to reduce the federal regulations, force Hospitals and doctors to become competitive, stop the insurance companies from setting there price which drives up individuals price. Do tort Reform. Stop employers from providing health insurance this will force health insurance companies to compete for the individual and force prices down.

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40
5 votes,
Mar 22, 2016

I agree that socialistic programs can work on small scales. Once those numbers are too high, it is bound to fail. Sustainability gets very expensive as to manage so many resources and numbers will cause it to collapse on itself.

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-1
1 vote,
Mar 22, 2016

I want real Socialized Medicine. Google a map of the countries that have it. It would include every country we consider Advanced or Civilized: Western Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, even Israel. Most of the kinks have been worked out of the process by now.

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0
0 votes,
Mar 22, 2016

When dealing with industries that do not lend themselves to small businesses, basically those with enormously high costs of entry, this strategy can cause more problems than it solves. Insurers and healthcare providers operate on a national scale and asking them to cope with 50 different sets of regulations would be a disaster unto itself. The heavy lifting for regulating healthcare, which really should have high minimum standards because we are all running the same operating system "humans 1.0, " has to be done at the federal level for it to actually accomplish the goal of lowering the cost healthcare for anyone.

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0
main reply
0 votes,
Mar 22, 2016

We need to make things simpler, not more complicated. Get rid of employer-paid health plans. Insurance needs to be portable, and employers need less excuses not to hire people or give them raises. Everybody gets a Health Savings Account policy with a $5000 deductible, and a tax deductible Health Saving Account to save up money to pay for every day expenses. We subsidize the poor and we subsidize the chronically ill like diabetics, schizophrenics, and people with Multiple Sclerosis. Insurance only works when people pool their money for an occasional payout to some of the insured. Everyone goes to the doctor for a check up or if they're sick or injured. It doesn't make sense for insurance to pay for those visits because instead of just paying the fee to the doctor you're paying the fee to the doctor + doctor's administrative costs for getting reimbursed by insurance + administrative costs for the insurance company to reimburse the doctor + profit for the insurance company. Everyday medical expenses could be a lot cheaper if we paid for them 100% out of pocket instead of running them through insurance all the time. Insurance companies are the middle man. Cut out the middle man wherever you can. Most of us could save up a $5000 deductible by the time we needed it if we weren't paying such high insurance premiums to begin with. Those who can't because of poverty or chronic illness would be subsidized with our tax dollars, NOT every individual who makes less than $46,000 and every family that makes less than $60,000, but everyone who actually NEEDS a subsidy.

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