100
User voted There isn't enough data to decide.
2 votes
Jul 20, 2015

To me, I am flustered to why Stanley Kubrick was needed for the space landing. There would be no other reason but to have him work on the set to fake the moon landing. For a very long time I had no reason not to believe that the moon landing was fake, but after I found out about Stanley Kubrick working on the moon landing, I simply don't know. There is a interesting theory surrounding around The Shining that can be explained in the movie Room 237 about how The Shining is really a confession of the fake moon landing. The link below. youtube.com/watch?v=_u4A5tJ2j3o

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100
User voted Yes.
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2 votes,
Feb 4, 2016

In addition to IMHO's excellent response, the idea that Kubrick needed to express a confession in The Shining rather than in public or even in a more overt way (when The Shining is an adaptation of a Stephen King novel and has very clear themes for every element) is conspiratorial gibberish. And if Kubrick was brought in to help fake the moon landing, it would not just be him but hundreds of others who would need to have kept the secret. Organizations are never that ironclad for that long with secrets.

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100
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2 votes,
Jul 30, 2015

While writing 2001: A Space Oddyssey (1968), Arthur C. Clarke (1917-2008) had to research space travel by interviewing several scientists and experts, before it actually had developed to the point where the moonlanding was even possible (compareable with Star Trek: The Motion Picture depicting the color of planet Earth seen from outer space, based on a guess - I'm writing this from my memory so I might be wrong). It was mostly based on theory and advances in space travel up until that point.

At the same time (before the novel by Arthur C. Clarke came out), Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999) was working on the movie production for 2001: A Space Oddyssey (1968, screenplay co-written by Clarke). It could be that, like Arthur C. Clarke's collaboration with quantum scientists and theoretical mathematicians (source needed) to write his novel, Kubrick's vision for enhanced spacetravel (with the moonlanding being an arguably minor part of that) was called upon for the actual moonlanding (1969) that would take place a full year after the release of the movie that he produced and directed.

"Life imitates art"; sometimes it's the other way around, and other times art shapes or dictates life and people get upset by that (understandably so).

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100
User voted Yes.
main reply
1 vote,
Jul 18, 2016

The problem with all conspiracy theories is that when you show the theory wrong, they add, well what about this or this in a never ending game or whack a mole. The rock with the letter C on it, look at the original and no letter C, the “letter” can only be seen in one print and later generation copies of it. Well, what about .....

And it goes on and on.

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